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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN2 29
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English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
fiscal responsibility. >> there is a fundamental difference between short-term deficits and an structural deficits. the short-term deficits largely were inherited by the rock obama -- barack obama and we need to understand its short-term deficits are understandable because we are in a recession and we have to undeclared wars and a number of bailouts and unemployment is very high. so he made it very clear that he wants to try to take the steps to try to get the economy going on in consistent basis and bring unemployment down. he is going to propose a number of tax cuts or tax preferences as well as spending increases to try to do that and that may exacerbate the short-term but then he pivoted which i think is important to talk about the structural deficit. and that is what threatens the state. it's not the ice that is above the water. it's the ice that is below the water. it's not the debt on the balance sheet, it is what is off the balance sheet that disrupts the future and he talked about three things, he talked about freezing a portion of discretionary spending, less than 20% of the fed
have been recommended by the imf with reduced short-term deficits and your obligations so that you can recover faster. a number of ministers, including the health minister, resigned in this includes a number of other social safety nets rather than this for a politician. and over the first time in 1944, they had a country wide vote with all these other things to put it to a vote. so even though it was more than 800% of gdp, a small group of people have invested all the money in mortgage-backed securities. and so we have two options in one is to cut the social safety net obligations and pay this back all the foreign creditors and the other option is to do a loan repayment program and while preserving our safety nets at home and most people had understandably been a part of the second one. and this includes a public health and it was essentially a fact. some indicators were slightly improved, like sweet quality and there was no increase in suicides, we just couldn't find anything among four different groups and there is only one blip and there was a sudden spike in emergency room visits.
and replace the savings so it wouldn't add to the deficit by increasing some government fees and perhaps requiring a higher contribution from federal workers for their retirement program and maybe about a 65 to $70 billion deal. it wouldn't be a deficit reduction deal, but it would, it would be an agreement on the level of discretionary spending or the appropriations bills for the next one or two years. >> host: and talk to us about scale. is the a large deal? is it a small deal if how does this kind of fit in our range of options? >> guest: this is not what you would call a grand bargain. it's a small deal. they deliberately set a pretty modest target because they thought something more ambitious wouldn't get done. so in the effort of finding some sort of an agreement for this year, this year's appropriations level and possibly it looks like next year's, they would just target that and see if they could reach an agreement on that, and that's kind of where we're headed. >> host: talking about the prospects for a budget deal this morning with the concord coalition's bob bixby. if you'd li
-ax cuts. this happened with the sequestration, a smart savings. reducing the deficit by closing wasteful tax loopholes and making job-creating investments to spur economic growth. as we close out this year, i hope republicans and democrats can put aside our differences and work together to produce results for the middle class. mr. president, the presiding officer has served in the house. i've served in the house. ii'm fortunate to serve here in the senate. mr. president, when i first came to this body, democrats had their focus on what they thought the foundation of democracy was. the republicans did the same. they thought they knew the right thing to do. but you know, mr. president, we could never get what we wanted. each side couldn't get what they thought was the way it should be. so what did we do? we worked together and came up with compromises to move legislation forward. let's get back to where we were. that's what this body needs. so, i hope we can put aside our differences and work together like we used to. it's also time for republicans to work with us instead of against us to
responsibility. >> there is a difference between short-term deficits and long-term deficits. the short-term deficits were largely inherited by barack obama and we need to recognize that some level are understandable and and to make it very clear to try to get the economy growing and to try to bring unemployment down. and then he pivoted this structural deficit and that is what threatens that. >> it is not the debt that's on the balance sheet, but it's what off the balance sheet and he talked about three things. he talked about freezing a portion of discretionary spending, less than 20% of the federal budget for three years, you know, three years are better than one and especially since spending has increased 20% or more over the last two years. >> there are lots of holes in that and they have to put a truck through it and it does provide some constraints that would be there. and thirdly he came out for a fiscal commission and this includes other spending restraints and tax reform that will terminate or revenues and i think it's important that we do it this year and to act before are me
-off family. which means by the time she starts school she is already behind. that deficit can compound itself over time. and finally rising inequality and declining mobility are bad for our democracy. ordinary folks can't write massive campaign checks or high-priced lobbyists and lawyers to secure policies that tilt the playing field in their family and at everyone else's expense. so people get the bad taste that the system is rigged. and that increases cynicism and polarization and it decreases the political participation that is a requisite part of our system of self-government. this is an issue that we have to tackle. if in fact the majority of americans agree that our number one priority is to restore opportunity and broad-based growth for all americans to question his why ask washington washington -- why his washington consistently failed to act? i think a big reason is the myths that have developed around the issue of inequality. first there is the myth but this is a problem restricted to a small share of predominantly minority people. this isn't a broad based problem or a black problem
,000. >> so deficit or not or maybe especially if we have a national deficit. spending money on pell grants is red investment for our taxpayers. >> yeah. i was going correct you and say it's not spending. it's investment. you are correct. thank you. i appreciate the opportunity. the porps of moving as a nation away from a philosophy toward higher education i've lived importance of the degree. but of course the world has changed a lot in the last 40 years. i would say the federal financial aid system is one of the great success story in the history of the federal government. when our goal was access, we have provided access to higher education for people in the country. like never seen before. in a degree that us value. the income won't be higher. people are graduating with disagrees that make their income no higher. we now have to move from a system that provide access alone to one that incents success so making people's lives better. of course, while it's happening. costs have gone up too. people are now leaving if they don't get a degree most often would too argue they're literally worse
the surplus but they also share the deficits so if there is a regional deficit, the pain will be shared in terms of frankly rolling blackouts if it comes to that. we can hope for a cool summer in the summer of 2016 that's not necessarily a prudent approach. with that i would be happy to answer any questions. >> our next witness is mr. john morrissey and you are recognized for five minutes. >> good morning chairman, ranking member and members of the subcommittee for holding this hearing and the opportunity to testify. as i acknowledged there is a significant change occurring on the energy landscape. the operation in america has experienced only a modest incremental change over the last decades yet in recent years the development of new technology is bringing much more rapid change to the system that can't be disruptive. i think embracing these changes will allow a much more efficient utilization of energy resources. the challenge before us is to enable the system to be more efficient through the utilization of technology and foster the development of a diverse set of competitive energy r
problems that do threaten the moral drift and cognitive and scholastic deficits, the healers, social reformers and confidence builders, do not have the answers. on the contrary, they stand in the way of a genuine solution. >> yes. i'm not saying that we don't have problems in our schools, even though i don't think that boys are pathological, i do think that there is evidence that they need character education as girls do as well. as most societies know, it takes more effort to socialize a young man and young boys who are morally neglected, and in most societies, they invest a lot of effort into civilizing young man. in our schools there has been a decline of character education and moral education and replacing it with things like self-esteem programs, various programs that are doubtful and merit. and we have a tried-and-true method of civilizing boys, good sportsmanship they can get from their coaches, most of all from parents, and we've kind of moved away from that. the second problem with boys, is that i believe they have become second-class citizens in our schools. and the proble
problems that do threaten childrens' prospects, their moral drift, cognitive and scholastic deficits, the healers, social reformers and confidence builders don't have the answers. on the contrary they stand in the way of genuine solutions. >> yes. i am not saying we don't have problems in our school. i don't thing boils are pathological but there is good evidence that they need character education and girls do too. most societies know that it takes more effort to socialize a young man and young boys who are morally neglected. very unpleasant ways of doing this, i have noticed. most societies in just a lot of effort into humanizing, civilizing young men. what i have seen is in our school there has been a decline of character education and moral education, move replacing it with things like self-esteem programs, various therapeutic approaches that are -- we have a tried and true method of civilizing boys. it is through good sportsmanship, they can get from their coaches and moral guidance from parents, but reinforced by teachers and moved away from that. i believe now boys have become
, smarter way to reduce our deficit. but because of sequestration, too many families and small businesses in new hampshire have felt firsthand the dramatic effects of us failing to do our job. with the potential budget agreement coming from senator murray and congressman ryan, we have an opportunity to reduce these impacts, to finally get to work replacing the harmful cuts from sequestration with a responsible plan that will grow our economy and create jobs. finally, it's my hope that a budget agreement also includes an extension of unemployment benefits for the millions of americans who lost their jobs through no fault of their own. now, in new hampshire, our unemployment rate is lower than the national average, and it has been consistently throughout this recession. but that doesn't help if you're in a household where the breadwinners are unemployed. that household has 100% unemployment rate. so despite the significant progress for our economy since the recession, the unemployment rate remains unacceptably high. and for millions of americans finding a job remains very difficult in this
the largest per capita deficit in the country, a total debt of about $3.5 billion. before taking office he did several terms as mayor of stanford, connecticut, from 1995 to 2009, and what's particularly relevant to us today for this conversation is promising to make 2012 the year of education in connecticut, he tackled a reform agenda in a state that has long been known for one of the nation's widest racial achievement gaps. and the governor took the lead in passing one of the nation's more dramatic education bills. signed it in may 2012. it was public act 12116, an act concerning education reform. some of the package's most significant features required a new teacher evaluation pilot in which 45% of the evaluation would be based on student learning. the governor's package created a commissioner's network similar to the recovery school district in louisiana which has the ability to take authority over 25 of the state's lowest performing schools. to date, 11 have been entered into that network. and it increased per-pupil charter school funding to $10,500 in fiscal 2013, ask that figure will go
spent on the traditional program. particularly when there's so much concerned with the deficit and debt. medicare is historically -- payments below or equal to what medicare would expect to be in the traditional program for beneficiaries who enroll in the plan. this changed in 2003, and by 2009, payments were considerably higher than medicare would've paid for the same beneficiaries if they were in the traditional program. this cause every beneficiary more in added part b premiums and provide a little incentives for m.a. plans to become more efficient. when i examined the 2009 plan data i found wide variation in m.a. plans cost relative to traditional medicare spending, even controlling for plan levels, plan types and payment levels. that suggest there was room for a lot more efficiency in the program, variable across plants. and the policy changes that were in the aca reflect recommendations that congress is on medicare payment advisory commission has advocated for years. third, many of the concerns raised about 2014 offerings either to my mind from what i've looked at are not consiste
health care costs shows up in entire paychecks for workers and/or deficits the government. indeed, the cbo estimates that in the second decade the aca is in effect once it is in effect it will shave .5% of gdp off our deficit every year. which is about $80 billion each year in today's economy. "the new york times" reports this morning that the cost of the aca are heading in the other direction. so economic benefits are going up, costs are going down. now, how do we implement all these benefits to make sure they translate to better care for everyone? because it will allow -- as i said, millions of americans have been benefiting from them since 2010. what we have to do is keep spreading the word so america's know that these options are available to them. for americans without insurance are working to help them get covered. this is where much of the attention has been since october 1. the new health insurance marketplace will help ensure millions of hard-working americans find affordable health care. in states where governors and legislators, candidates and state-based workstations w
for the footprint and recall that under the miso agreement they all showed a surplus but they also share the deficit. so if there's a regional deficit, the pain will be shared in terms of frankly rolling blackouts if it comes to that. we can hope for a cool summer in the summer of 2016, but that's not necessary a prudent approach. so with that i would be happy to answer any questions at the appropriate time. >> thank you, mr. moeller. our next witness is mr. john norris. you are recognized for five minutes. >> good morning, chairman whitfield, ranking member mcnerney, and members of the subcommittee. thank you calling this thing. and the opportunity to testify. as i acknowledged in a written test with their significant changes occurring on our energy landscape. the operation of our energy system in america has experienced in my view only modest incremental change over the last many decades. yet in recent years the rapid development of new technologies is bringing much more rapid change to the system. that change can be disruptive. i think embracing these changes will allow a much more efficient util
deficit representing 17% of total revenue and, therefore, having to go in a different direction when a lot of states were simply saying we're going to cut, cut, cut, actually realizing our gap was too big, it add to be a combination of the two, i went out on road, and i got beat up. but somebody had to explain what we were trying to do. and when it came to education, i did that as well. and there were a lot of people mad at me and, you know, folks spending a lot of money to try to defeat an organized effort at school reform even though they supported certain aspects of it, you know? it was the total picture that they didn't want to see happen. they might carve out a corner that they liked, but it was the total picture. somebody has to be the leader, somebody has to have the discussion, somebody has to bring the discussion to the communities, and somebody has to demonstrate to members of the legislature that, you know, you mean business, and you want to work with them, you want their input be, but you need to change direction. and i'll go back to this, you know, hartford be, new haven, brid
-capita deficit representing 17% of total revenue and therefore i had to go in a different direction. when a lot of states were saying we have to cut, realizing that our gap was too big to cut her way out of it and too big to tax her way out of it and had to be a combination of two. someone had to explain what we are trying to do and when it came to education i did that as well. there were a lot of people mad at me and a lot of folks betting a lot of money to try to defeat and organized efforts even though they supported certain aspects of it. it was the total picture they didn't want to see and it might carve out a corner that they like but that was the total picture. somebody has to have the discussion. someone has to have that discussion with the communities and someone has to demonstrate to members of the legislature that you want to work with him and get their input that we need to change directions. go back to hartford new haven ridge ford new london new britain failing to properly educate 40% of their kids. those are some the largest school districts. you can't succeed as a state when you
be especially we have a national deficit. spending money on pell grants is a big investment for our taxpayers. >> thank you and it highlights come as it highlights in her testimony, the importance of moving of the nation. >> i grew up in a single parent family and i understand because i have lived the importance of these degrees. the world has changed a lot in the last 40 years and i would say that the federal financial aid system is one of the greatest in the history of the federal government. when our one uncle was accessed and we have provided access to higher education for people in this country like i've never seen before. the challenge is that when these programs started 40 years ago, access was enough and if you look at the income potential of someone who had just a little time in college, your income could be higher. of course, today that has changed and if you don't graduate with a degree that adds value to society, your income will not be higher than many people are now moving from a system that provides access alone to one that can sense the success that we are making peoples peop
, loss of bladder continents, and the deficits of treatment are currently outweighing the benefits. so that test is no longer recommended. the numbers are pretty clear that the overdiagnosed of early breast cancer happens in many cases as well, and there are a number of things that are being thertaken to try to improve situation clinically. from the point of view the national cancer institute, the thing we are trying to solve is the question of how we can take these early abnormalities and tests to kinds of distinguish between those that are likely to evolve into life- threatening illnesses and those beniare simply the nine -- gn abnormalities that would not cause serious symptoms or life- threatening situations had they not been detected. we're talking with leading researchers about their areas of expertise at the nih. dr. harold varmus is the director of the national cancer institutes. al is joining us from cambridge, ohio. caller: good morning. it is a pleasure to be able to talk to a doctor out here after working for 40 years at a good job but cannot seem to ever get to talk to a d
and deficit spending can find, how are you going to get a balanced budget? we don't like the current economy, what i going to do to get us to grow at the rate we ought to? coming out of this deep of recession, we will be growing five or 6% a year. we should be pulling back into the middle class. we will be solving a lot of our problems by just the sheer dynamics of a recovery. we are getting none of that right now. don't just tell me which are getting. don't know what you're for. i've been to all too many campaigns in the last 15 years that have been negative, eddie, personality oriented and they think they don't show the country well and i don't think will solve our problems with that approach. i hope you will read "breakout" but if you agree with me that this was an important concept inhibiting the people who think in that line in future, think about prison guards of the pass, we could really begin a dialogue that is future past and is very powerful in terms of bringing many people together who wouldn't know my think they were on the same side and i would appreciate it if you decide the st
challenges that your country is, and we went through a strategic review several years ago and a deficit reduction action plan, all of which has decreased our budget by 10-15%. and and this has required all kinds of trade-offs along the way too. going forward and recently we just had the speech which indicates that the government is looking to refurbish their canada first defense strategy and in that way allows us to look at where we can invest in new areas. so there will be trade-offs to come certainly within a stable envelope of tight resources. >> okay. and then the last question i wanted to ask is on author rad. norad. and you mentioned in your comments that, expansion, if you will, into the maritime domain, i think there's a lot of interest, too, in cyber domain, and you did reference the author rad strategic -- norad strategic review that's underway. can you give us some insights into what the u.s. and canada are exploring into that strategic review and what types of changes we might expect to see come out of that? >> i know that the commander of norad who is not only the u.s. comm
group of symptoms which we call the the cognitiveoms, deficits. those are problems with memory and problems of attention. sadly, we do not have good treatments for those latter two categories. we have treatments for hallucinations and delusions, medications at work quite well. but the other parts of this syndrome, the parts that are often even more disabling, we need to come up with much better treatments. that is part of why nih is so focused on developing both better diagnostics and better therapeutics for these kinds of illnesses. host: this tweet on the issue of mental health -- are there any other significant development being made in other countries? guest: it is a great question. recently, mental disorder research has become global. there is a lot of interest in global mental health, and that is not just from europe and australia. canada and increasingly in other parts of the world. the disorders we're talking about our global and not unique to the developed world. as a result, there have been some very interesting little-resource environments to try to figure out how to
't want to -- hold on, says the talk about. let's make up the deficit. and he begins to haul out yeller boys out of his pocket. it's a most amazing good idea, duke. you have got a clever head on you, says the king. blessed if you ain't helping us out again, and he begun to haul out yeller jackets and stack them out. they made up the 6,000 clean and clear. says, say the -- say, says the duke, let's count this money and then take and give it to the girls. good land, duke. let me hug you, it's the most dazzling idea ever a hand struck. you certainly got the most astonishing head i ever seen. oh, this is the boss dodge. there ain't no mistake about it. let 'em fetch along their suspicions now if they want to. this'll lay 'em out. i don't know where i am, but i'm pretty close to ten. but as you might expect, they get -- [inaudible] because the two real heirs show up. [laughter] [applause] so anyways, thank you. >> it's really nice to see how bad guys get their comeuppance, at least in fiction if not always in real life. our next reader is peter -- [inaudible] peter is a poet and a volunteer
of scholarships for the kids who came out of there. effect on the town of the mine closing was deficit in the account had been through lots of hard times bigger than labor strikes and i write about what big strikes in my book. it had been through the depression the aldermen voted to work three days a week so everybody could work. but when the mine closed-end, nobody could believe it. they tried to get people to get in to be a white knight to save the town and have someone else bought it. a company that bought it from the original owners and they were mining deep and mining fast and getting the best stuff out there and then environmental protection agency came in and said you can't keep doing what you're doing. and between the way the gulf resources managed the mine and the epa, they closed down and this became a superfund site. epa is the one who tries to keep the air clean and the water claim. this town did not have clean air or clean water. so there were lots of poisons that were spread out on the ground. while this one company was managing the mine, there was a back house fire. the
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)